Contributed Editorial

  1. RFID Is Dead...Long Live RFIT
    5/15/2009
    At RFID Journal Live! in Orlando last week (28-29 April 2009) it became obvious that RFID has outgrown the "identification" (ID) part of the acronym and now deserves to be viewed as "information technology" (IT). By Bert Moore Editor
  2. Guest Column: RFID Is Dead...Long Live RFIT
    5/15/2009
    At RFID Journal Live! in Orlando last week (28-29 April 2009) it became obvious that RFID has outgrown the "identification" (ID) part of the acronym and now deserves to be viewed as "information technology" (IT). By Bert Moore, Editor, AIM Global
  3. Guest Column: Accuracy - Certain Is The New Estimated
    5/3/2009
    Today, there are new technologies available that raise the standards of accuracy. Estimation-based solutions used to be the gold standard. They gave users a rough idea of where a piece of equipment or person was located. But, the new buzzword is “certainty based” – technology that has been developed to make true accuracy much more of a reality. True accuracy means that when the RTLS provides the location of a person or asset, the location information is absolutely certain and does not rely on estimates. By Ari Naim, CEO, CenTrak
  4. Accuracy - Certain Is The New Estimated
    5/3/2009
    Today, there are new technologies available that raise the standards of accuracy. Estimation-based solutions used to be the gold standard. They gave users a rough idea of where a piece of equipment or person was located. But, the new buzzword is “certainty based” – technology that has been developed to make true accuracy much more of a reality. True accuracy means that when the RTLS provides the location of a person or asset, the location information is absolutely certain and does not rely on estimates. By Ari Naim, CEO, CenTrak
  5. Mobile RFID: Human Intervention In An Automated World
    4/23/2009
    Although RFID is often used as a way to automate and increase the efficiency and accuracy of existing processes, there are usually a handful of exceptions and special cases that have to be dealt through other processes. Perhaps that is why even factory processing lines have diverting arms and stack-off areas. In the real-world not everything works out quite as planned. As we try to divide and sub-divide all of our existing processes into neat and tidy use-cases, inevitably there will be some scenarios that have not been accounted for that contradict the defined norm. By Wayne Pau, Principal Consultant for RFID, Sybase
  6. Mobile RFID: Human Intervention In An Automated World
    4/23/2009
    Although RFID is often used as a way to automate and increase the efficiency and accuracy of existing processes, there are usually a handful of exceptions and special cases that have to be dealt through other processes. Perhaps that is why even factory processing lines have diverting arms and stack-off areas. In the real-world not everything works out quite as planned. As we try to divide and sub-divide all of our existing processes into neat and tidy use-cases, inevitably there will be some scenarios that have not been accounted for that contradict the defined norm. By Wayne Pau, Principal Consultant for RFID, Sybase
  7. Guest Column: Track-And-Trace Transforms How Manufacturers Think About The Supply Chain
    4/2/2009
    Pressures to comply with government and private sector regulations have driven RFID (radio frequency identification) adoption among manufacturers. While state- and retailer-generated regulations lack the ability to fully streamline supply chains, many industries are looking to the federal government to set national standards with the ultimate goal of a safe, secure, and efficient global supply chain. By Andre Pino, Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer, Acsis, Inc.
  8. Track-And-Trace Transforms How Manufacturers Think About The Supply Chain
    4/2/2009
    Pressures to comply with government and private sector regulations have driven RFID (radio frequency identification) adoption among manufacturers. While state- and retailer-generated regulations lack the ability to fully streamline supply chains, many industries are looking to the federal government to set national standards with the ultimate goal of a safe, secure, and efficient global supply chain. By Andre Pino, Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer, Acsis, Inc.
  9. Guest Column: U.S. Food Safety — Will Food Track-And-Trace Finally Take Off?
    3/23/2009
    Some large agricultural companies have already embraced the idea of field-to-fork (or at least field-to-processing plant) traceability to limit the size of product recalls, protect brand image and, incidentally, safeguard the public. Many of these companies own or control the production or output in other countries and could, therefore, adopt a track-and-trace methodology for their local businesses without the need for local government regulation or cooperation. By Bert Moore, Editor, AIM Global
  10. U.S. Food Safety: Will Food Track-And-Trace Finally Take Off?
    3/23/2009
    Some large agricultural companies have already embraced the idea of field-to-fork (or at least field-to-processing plant) traceability to limit the size of product recalls, protect brand image and, incidentally, safeguard the public. Many of these companies own or control the production or output in other countries and could, therefore, adopt a track-and-trace methodology for their local businesses without the need for local government regulation or cooperation. By Bert Moore, Editor, AIM Global